German Artists at War, Part Two

GERMAN ARTISTS AT WAR The Good Soldier, Part Two A battlefield is not an artist’s natural habitat. Fighting in combat is not an artist’s métier.  But Franz Marc (1880-1916) wrote very militant and martial tracts for the Blue Rider Almanac. In 1912 he said...

German Artists at War, Part One

GERMAN ARTISTS AT WAR Part One The Art of Lying In 1928 Edward Bernays, the American nephew of Sigmund Freud, wrote on a newly significant topic–Propaganda. Bernays was well acquainted with his uncle’s theories of human psychology and injected tools of...

Marc Chagall at War

Marc Chagall and the War, Part Two Vitebsk as an Art Center When the Great War began, like all eligible and fit young men, Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was conscripted for military service to his motherland, the Russian Empire. A more unsuitable soldier could hardly be...

Marc Chagall and Jewish Theater, Part Two

Marc Chagall in Moscow The Murals for the Jewish Theater, Part Two Perhaps because he was the first to visually imagine a totally Yiddish world, mystical and magical, sophisticated and folkish, avant-garde and traditional, Marc Chagall’s ability to capture the...

Marc Chagall and Jewish Theater, Part One

Marc Chagall in Moscow The Murals for the Jewish Theater To the end of his life, Marc Chagall remained circumspect about his ouster from the People’s Art School in Vitebsk. And the coup against the artist was no small event. Chagall had been appointed by none...

Marc Chagall and the Russian Revolution

Marc Chagall and the Revolution Vitebsk as an Art Center, Part Two A quiet and gentle man who loved his wife and cared for his family, especially his newly arrived daughter, Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was an unlikely revolutionary. In fact, his position was not unlike...

The Russian Avant-Garde at War, Part Two

Marc Chagall and the War Vitebsk as an Art Center, Part One The fable that the Jews stabbed Germany in the back during the Great War began early, put forward by those who could not comprehend that the German army had lost the Battle of the Marne in 1914. This, the...

The Russian Avant-Garde at War, Part One

The Avant-Garde Artists and The Great War Popular Culture While it is undoubtedly true that the Treaty of Versailles of 1919 was somewhat responsible for the next war, the Second World War, it is also true that the First World War put an end not just to some empires...

The Futurists Go To War, Part Three

Futurism in Transition From War to Fascism The Great War did not go well for the Italians. Aside from the enthusiastic Futurists and their nationalist sympathizers, such as Benito Mussolini, most Italians regarded the war with wary eyes. The nation had to be bribed...

The Futurists Go To War, Part Two

Futurism in Transition From War to Fascism Although in the histories of the Great War, Italy is usually written of as a “minor power,” or a minor player in the larger structure of the War. The nation was a latecomer to the conflict and had limited goals....

The Futurists Go to War, Part One

Italy at War The Futurists Fall When Filippo Tommaso Emilio Marinetti (1876-1944) called for “war” in his famous Futurist Manifesto of 1909, he was not asking for actual war, as in clashes between nations. The poet was demanding a rebellion against the...

The Great War and Traditional Painting

French Visual Culture and The Great War Painting War One of the oddities of the French response of the French to the Great War was that the visual reaction was in large part one of a barrage of popular culture. While the British, English, Irish, Scottish, produced a...
Page 3 of 2212345...1020...Last »

If you have found this material useful, please give credit to Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette and Art History Unstuffed.
Thank you.

Get in Touch!

7 + 13 =