The Soviet Pavilion 1925

Years in the making, the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes finally opened during the Spring and Summer of 1925. Because the chief goal, in the minds of the host nation of France was to display the superiority of all things “French”...

Gustav Klutsis

Alexander Rodchenko and Vavana Stepanova were lucky to live out their lives peacefully. In the brutal period of Stalin’s Russia, artists were suppressed. Starting in the late 1920s, the mood of the government became less tolerant of avant-garde efforts and the turn...

Alexander Rodchenko

Alexander Rodchenko (1891-1956), formally a painter, retired from painting in 1921 and became a designer of posters that became iconic of the brief period of favoritism and freedom. A patriot, loyal to this new Russia he stated, “We had visions of a new world,...

Destroying the Bauhaus

When the mayor of Dessau, Fritz Hesse, asked the Bauhaus to take residence in his industrial city, part of his promise was not only land for the school but also a site for faculty housing. The city provided Burgkühnauer Allee, quite close to the school itself, in a...

Moholy-Nagy and Typography

The experiments of Moholy-Nagy encompassed what he termed an “entire field of optical expression,” combining painting, which was traditional, photography which was industrial, and film, which was characterized by moving images. In one of the early books, Painting,...

Moholy-Nagy at the Bauhaus

László Moholy-Nagy returned to one of the first manifestations of “writing with light” in his “photograms,” a term he coined, in which chemicals and light interact upon a support. The result of the strange ghost like prints captured and frozen by light was what he...

If you have found this material useful, please give credit to Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette and Art History Unstuffed.
Thank you.

Get in Touch!

5 + 10 =