Art Deco in Post-War Paris

Defining Art Deco The Meaning of “Moderne” One should always beware of long titles, too many words usually conceal or reveal inner contradictions. Take, for example, the 1925 Paris International Exposition, the name of which is long and self-defeating:...

Constructivism on Display, Part Two

The Brief Existence of Constructivism At the Paris Fair of 1925 The International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts was “international,” stressing the nationalism of the post-war  period, but the French, the host nation, proved to be...

Constructivism on Display, Part One

The Brief Existence of Constructivism The Years of Lenin The word “Constructivism” was a Russian word that came from multiple sources in Russia and spread to Western Europe very quickly, as soon as the Civil War ended in 1921. In fact, the slogan of the 1920 Dada Fair...

Producing Soviet Culture

Producing Soviet Culture Popova and Stepanova The study of modern art and design is noteworthy for its lack of women included in the history. That is not to say that there were no women who were artists—to the contrary, there were numerous women who braved the odds...

The End of the Russian Avant-Garde

Gustav Klutsis (1895-1938) The Last of the Avant-Garde Alexander Rodchenko and Varvara Stepanova were lucky to live out their lives peacefully. In the brutal period of Stalin’s Russia, artists were suppressed. Starting in the late 1920s, the mood of the government...

Post-War Cubism in Paris, Part Four

Cubism After Cubism Part Two: Orphism Between the Wars At  4:35 a.m on a chill and cloudy day in July, on the 25th day of the year 1909, a daring French aviator Louis Blériot (1872-1936), took off in an airplane of his own making, rising above Calais on the coast and...

Post-War Cubism in Paris, Part Three

Cubism After Cubism Part One: Theories of Pre-War Orphism Before the Great War, there were camps occupying various terrains within the art movement called “Cubism.” The name, as is well-known, was a bon mot coming either from Henri Matisse or Louis...

Post-War Cubism in Paris, Part Two

  Cubism After Cubism Paris Coming to Order, Part Two There was a second life for Cubism after the Great War. This lingering phase, a further development of an important art style was carried on by the so-called “Salon Cubistes,” who, although they had been away at...

Post-War Cubism in Paris, Part One

 Cubism After Cubism Paris Coming to Order, Part One What happened to Cubism? Before the Great War broke out, the movement seemed to be dominant, even hegemonic in Paris, but after the War was over, Cubism was history. In other words, the Great War nothing would ever...

German Artists at War, Part Two

GERMAN ARTISTS AT WAR The Good Soldier, Part Two A battlefield is not an artist’s natural habitat. Fighting in combat is not an artist’s métier.  But Franz Marc (1880-1916) wrote very militant and martial tracts for the Blue Rider Almanac. In 1912 he said...

German Artists at War, Part One

GERMAN ARTISTS AT WAR Part One The Art of Lying In 1928 Edward Bernays, the American nephew of Sigmund Freud, wrote on a newly significant topic–Propaganda. Bernays was well acquainted with his uncle’s theories of human psychology and injected tools of...
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If you have found this material useful, please give credit to Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette and Art History Unstuffed.
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